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LS.0005-00
© L. Sass
LS.0005-00
Christine Smith-Siddoway, Investigator on US National Science Foundation research grant, in a huge wind-scoop in Arthur Glacier on Mt. Little. Dark brown planar surface beyond her shows the shear fractures and faults she was studying to reconstruct previous tectonic activity in the area. The rock is Late Cretaceous Byrd Coast Granite. West Antarctica.
LS.0006-00
© L. Sass
LS.0006-00
J. Stone collecting glacial erratics off Wells Ridge for cosmogenic isotope exposure dating. Rock in foreground is Paleozoic (Cambrian) Swanson Formation, greenschist facies metagraywacke and metaturbidites of oceanic origin.Rock on peaks behind is Byrd Coast Granite, a Cretaceous leucogranite (granite) with A type chemistry. West Antarctica.
LS.0007-00
© L. Sass
LS.0007-00
Scott tent on the margin of the Arthur Glacier in front of the granite walls of Mt. Dolber. The rock is Late Cretaceous Byrd Coast Granite. West Antarctica.
LS.0008-00
© L. Sass
LS.0008-00
Mike Roberts on the summit pedaplane of The Billboard, with Mt Rhea in background. The peaks of Western Sarnoff Range are composed of Late Cretaceous Byrd Coast Granite. On right is Boyd Glacier. Left is the Arthur Glacier. Far distant peaks:(centre) E. Sarnoff Mts. & (left) Denfield Mts.
West Antarctica.
LS.0009-00
© L. Sass
LS.0009-00
Traversing back to Mt. Rea from The Billboard, a magnificent chunk of Late Cretaceous Byrd Coast Granite at western end of Sarnoff Mountains. It has shear walls except for ramp in centre of picture. Right is Arthur Glacier & left is Boyd Glacier. Sulzberger Ice Shelf in background.
The summit slopes of Billboard are a very old erosion surface. W.Antarctica.
LS.0010-00
© L. Sass
LS.0010-00
Chris Kugleman searching for glacial erratics on Mt. Spencer. Mt. Darling, & an unnamed tributary to Boyd Glacier is in background. During the Last Glacial Maximum the West Antarctic Ice Sheet was significantly thicker in this area. Cosmogenic Isotope dating allows researchers to reconstruct the paleo surface levels of the glacier. West Antarctica.
LS.0011-00
© L. Sass
LS.0011-00
Raised tracks in the snow after a storm. Most storms in the Ford Ranges come in with strong winds, which drift piles of snow up around camps. The end of the storm is often marked by a wind shift, which in this case eroded the storm drifts away, leaving only these hardened footprints.
West Antarcitca.
 

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